I get my book recommendations from a variety of places: friend, follower, & author recs, Amazon’s lists, Goodreads lists (especially this one), and a dozen other venues. But one thing I’m starting to notice more and more is that as movie adaptations of books become more popular, I tend to watch the movie first, then tackle the book because the movie struck a chord with me and made me want to know more. I know there’s a saying of don’t judge a book by it’s cover, but the one that I say more often now is ‘don’t judge a movie by its book.’ And I mean when it really comes down to movie adaptations, I get it. I understand it’s sad and frustrating to not see your favorite scene in the book or a scene that’s completely butchered. For me, that’s ok though. I’ve come to view movies and books as separate entities, and even though the source is the book, I also love that the movie takes that source and spins their own unique take that’ll take me by complete surprise. I love that thrill, I love that surprise, and I love the excitement it stirs in me. So it really got me thinking…what are some books where it’s the movie that motivated me to read it? I came up with these 8.

Listed in no particular order of favoritism. Some are romance, some aren’t. Bottom line is I loved them all, both the book and the movie.
1. City of Bones by Cassandra Clare. Ahhhh the feels. If it weren’t for this movie, I never would’ve been interested in reading the book, then the whole series, then the Infernal Devices trilogy. I would’ve completely missed out on the breathtaking Shadowhunter world and when I think that, I want to break down and sob. Not knowing these one-in-a-million characters? Miss out on one of the most epic love stories I’ve ever read? To entertain that possibility literally scares me. I’m so attached to this book, this series, their world I wish I could crawl in there and never have to come back out.
2. Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia & Margaret Stohl. This is probably one of the most underrated movies of this decade to be honest. I know most fans of the book didn’t like it and after I read the book, I can certainly see why since there’s a lot of deviations but when taken in on its own, this movie was outstanding. There’s this one scene (you will know which one if you watch it) that left me breathless. I was full-on swooning and tears were threatening to leak out of my eyes…just jeezus! The feels!! Both the book and the movie are worth checking out.

“Mortals. I envy you. You think you can change things. Stop the universe. Undo what was done long before you came along. You are such beautiful creatures.”

3. Divergent by Veronica Roth. I think it’s a truth universally acknowledged that both this movie and the book are a smashing success. I mean, Theo James as the dark & deadly Four?? *THUD* <– that was me passing out from excessive swooning by the way. His performance (along with all the other talented actors) was so well-done and compelling I had to give the book a shot. And I’m so glad I did

“Becoming fearless isn’t the point. That’s impossible. It’s learning how to control your fear, and how to be free from it.” 

4. The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks. Okay, kinda corny choice if I say so myself but the 4 times I’ve watched this movie, I cried every time. And a movie that could evoke so much emotion I had to check out the actual book. It was one of the very first romance books I read from a male author and while I admit it’s much more sappy than the movie, there is just something magical when you read a book that details all the highs and lows, the very beginning to the very end of a couple who has been through so much to be together…plus the quote at the bottom? Gets me every. single. time.

“I am nothing special, of this I am sure. I am a common man with common thoughts and I’ve led a common life. There are no monuments dedicated to me and my name will soon be forgotten, but I’ve loved another with all my heart and soul, and to me, this has always been enough…”

5. Beastly by Alex Flinn. One of my favorite classics is Beauty and the Beast so I was excited to watch a movie and read a book that’s a modern retelling. The target audience is for a younger crowd and the writing is more simplistic but there’s a certain beauty to simplicity. Alex Pettyfer plays the ‘Beast’ and learns that attractive appearances are not the only thing that’s to be valued, and finds love with a girl who sees past his face.

“Maybe we judge people too much by their looks because it’s easier than seeing what’s really important.”

6. The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman. This movie (and book) is one of my all-time favorite YA sci-fi/fantasy stories and the other 2 books in this series are just as fabulous. Follow the epic adventure of the female protagonist Lyra Belacqua as she discovers her true self and uncovers a heinous plot so devious it threatens the stability of the human/daemon world. The movie effects were pretty spot-on and congruent with the book’s descriptions. It’s a story that’s suitable for all ages.

“We are all subject to the fates. But we must all act as if we are not, or die of despair…death will sweep through all the worlds; it will be the triumph of despair, forever. The universes will all become nothing more than interlocking machines, blind and empty of thought, feeling, life…” 

7. Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. Both the movie and the book made me ugly cry. It’s a very bittersweet experience and follows the story of the Tuck family that drank from a magical spring and are granted eternal life, never growing old. So what happens when one of them falls in love with an ordinary girl? It’s a story that explores deep meanings of living, true sacrifice, and stays with you long after you’re through…

“Don’t be afraid of death; be afraid of an unlived life. You don’t have to live forever, you just have to live.” 

8. The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory. I am a huge fan of historical drama and for a period of time was extremely fascinated and obsessed with the time where Henry VIII ruled in England. I mean, this is a king who broke law after law for his multiple wives and the most notorious is his second wife and queen for a short time, Anne Boleyn. The movie adaptation was just as riveting and haunting as the actual book, which shines a light on the ‘other Boleyn girl’ most don’t know about: Anne’s younger sister Mary, and her role in this dangerous world full of political intrigue and greed. I want to stress that the book is more of a romance than the movie was and provides a detailed, partially fictional account of Mary’s story during the time period when Anne was queen.

“I shall be dark and French and fashionable and difficult. And you shall be sweet and open and English and fair. What a pair we shall be! What man can resist us?”