Intelligent.
Naive.
Statistic.

Raine Forester was an average girl leading an average life. She slipped beneath everyone’s radar, until Camron Moss, the most popular guy in school, took interest in her and changed everything.

Some acts are unforgivable.

Raine thought she’d been accepted. She thought she was one of them. She thought she was in love… until one moment made her realize she’d trusted the wrong person. Lies are told, hearts get broken, secrets are revealed, and sometimes, true love is found in the least likely places.

2.5 stars!
I picked this book up because of the catchy premise: the shy, studious girl gets the most popular guy in school but later ends up with his older brother?! Well, color me intrigued. Unfortunately, this book was SO far from what I anticipated it to be I was relieved that I finally finished. Don’t get me wrong, the groundwork of the story is a good one, but this book completely lacks depth: the writing was choppy, certain scenes got cut off at the most pivotal moments, and plot was severely underdeveloped. The story was more sweet and clichéd than I expected from reading the blurb and had I not been in the mood for something lighthearted, I’m pretty sure my rating would be even lower.
Before I launch into a tirade of complaints, I do want to point out a couple of positives this book had in case you’re thinking of reading it. For one, both main characters were likable and they made a really strong couple so the heartfelt scenes with them together? Thumbs up. Raine is such a resilient heroine and Jarret (the older brother) is a softhearted bad boy who stood up for her when she didn’t have anyone. There were a couple of scenes that really tugged on my heartstrings and some that made me smile.
At this point, this book was a solid 3-3.5 star read, nothing extraordinary but nothing bad either. The last 50% of the book is what really made me lower my rating. I loved that both of these characters were kindhearted people but that quality became their downfall here, letting everyone roll over them including each other and both made some unnecessary out-of-character decisions. When I finished the book, I was extremely unsatisfied. The best way to explain it is I felt like I was reading a very rough draft of the book. Important moments/conversations that you’d expect to read about are left off and the story immediately jumps into a new chapter.
Maybe the book was too YA for me. Maybe it really is a case of ‘it’s not you, it’s me. But what I’m chalking it up to is my high book standards – this book offered nothing great to me in terms of plot, emotion, or reading satisfaction and the fact that the writing didn’t stand out to me either makes this book a very unmemorable read overall. Since I am literally the only person who didn’t like the book, I say still give it a try if you want. But to like-minded readers if you read this one, I’m afraid you’ll end up feeling the same way as me.